What about AFTER the holidays?

Ditching the Holiday Blues

Introduction

The holiday season is a time to spend with family and friends, but it can also be hard on your mental health. There are so many different things going on at once — gatherings with friends and family, gifts to buy and wrap, decorations to set up — that it's easy to get overwhelmed by all the excitement. If you're feeling depressed during this time of year, there are some steps you can take to help yourself feel better.

When the holidays come around we see a whole new batch of movies, there's tons of parties to attend, and we get excited about buying gifts for friends and family.

It's the holidays and we're all feeling a little bit more jolly. When the holidays come around we see a whole new batch of movies, there's tons of parties to attend, and we get excited about buying gifts for friends and family. The holidays are also a time when we hear Christmas carols endlessly playing in stores or on the radio. It can be hard to resist getting caught up in all of this excitement!

Sometimes it's hard to break out of that high-fiving, partying, stress-free mindset once the season is over.

Sometimes it's hard to break out of that high-fiving, partying, stress-free mindset once the season is over. Even though people are trying to get back into a more normal routine, they still might be feeling a little sad or confused about what happened during the holidays. For instance, if you had a relationship end or lost someone close to you during this time period, it may not have fully hit you yet until now. That can cause some sadness and confusion as well as having difficulty getting back into your regular life routine (or even sleeping). It's important to take time for yourself and allow yourself time to heal from any emotional pain due to any loss or other issues you may have experienced during the holidays.

It's easy to lose track of ourselves in the frenzy of shopping, and when we do that we become vulnerable to strong negative feelings.

What do you do when your holiday season is less than jolly?

  • First, you have to remind yourself that it's not even your job to make sure everyone around you is always happy. You can't control other people's behaviors or how they choose to spend their time. The only thing you can control is how you spend your own time and what kind of energy you bring into the world.

  • Second, when we stop celebrating happy moments and focus on sad ones we end up feeling even more depressed than we would if we'd just let go of our negative thoughts in the first place! It's important for us all to make sure we take care of ourselves during the holidays—and beyond—so that we can be there for those around us who might need us most during this time

If you start to feel depressed during or soon after the holidays you may be suffering from depression fatigue or postholiday depression.

If you start to feel depressed during or soon after the holidays you may be suffering from depression fatigue or postholiday depression. Depression fatigue is a mood disorder that involves feeling fatigued, sluggish and unmotivated, often without any other emotional symptoms. Postholiday depression tends to hit later, within a week of returning home and settling into your regular routine after vacation. It can last for several weeks.

The holiday season can be full of exciting new things — visiting relatives, playing with your kids, planning year-end events — but it can also be stressful, confusing, and draining.

Every day, we are presented with opportunities to choose how we want our time to be spent. And the more we can focus on choosing positive experiences for ourselves and our loved ones, the less likely we are to get bogged down by the stress of the holidays. The idea that there is something inherently wrong with being unhappy during this time of year is a myth. We all have experiences that bring us joy, but also experiences that make us sad. For some people, it’s difficult not to feel upset when their family ignores them or doesn’t invite them over for Christmas dinner — but other people may find themselves feeling down because their family did invite them over for Christmas dinner but only because they felt obligated to do so and didn't really want them there at all!

If someone is in an abusive relationship or experiencing a serious illness like cancer or depression during this time of year (or any other time), then yes—the holidays can certainly become stressful! It might seem contradictory that someone would choose an abusive relationship over celebrating happy moments with their friends or family members during this season; however, sometimes these situations can happen without any warning signs beforehand such as depression symptoms showing up gradually instead of suddenly out-of-the blue."

You can't control other people's behaviors or how they choose to spend their time.

As much as we might like to, you can't control other people's behaviors or how they choose to spend their time. However, there are a few things you can do that will help lessen the impact of this stressor.

The first thing is to remind yourself that these things are not your fault. As humans, we tend to take on other people's problems as our own—but that's not always necessary or helpful. You may have noticed this when someone around you gets sick: You feel sicker too! It can be very difficult not to take on others' emotions and issues in this way because it feels like we're being helpful by caring about them so much; however, sometimes it's better for all parties involved if you're able to detach yourself from situations and keep yourself out of harm's way (literally!).

Another thing I like doing when faced with stressful situations is taking deep breaths and counting backwards from ten (or however many numbers it takes until I feel calm). This helps me refocus my attention away from whatever situation triggered the anger/frustration/sadness/etc., etc., etc., towards something more wholesome—in this case: self-care!

You can only control how you spend your own time.

You can only control how you spend your own time.

You can’t control other people's behaviors or how they choose to spend their time. That might feel unfair, but it’s important to remember that no one—not even the most dedicated and generous of friends and family—can read your mind and anticipate what you need in a given moment. You can only control how you spend your own time during this busy season.

Don't waste precious energy wishing someone would change their behavior or attitude toward you, because it won't happen unless they want it to happen (and sometimes even then). What happens is often outside of our control, so focusing on what we can do instead is important for happiness and peace of mind during stressful times like these!

When we stop celebrating happy moments and focus on sad ones we end up feeling even more depressed.

When we stop celebrating happy moments and focus on sad ones, we end up feeling even more depressed. It’s important to focus on the good things in life, and not let yourself get overwhelmed by what you can’t control.

So next time you feel down about the holidays, try these tips:

  • Focus on what makes you happy and what brings you joy. What do you love about the holiday season? Do something that brings those feelings back – whether it’s baking cookies with your kids or watching Christmas movies with friends!

  • Don't take things personally. It's easy for people to be grumpy during the holidays because they're stressed out dealing with family issues or work deadlines. If someone says something rude to you, don't assume it's aimed at just YOU personally - there may be other reasons why they are upset right now (like having too much going on around them). Think of this as a time when people need extra help from their loved ones; don't isolate yourself because someone else may seem unkind!

You can make it easier to enjoy being alone by doing things that you like to do.

Ditching the holiday blues is all about finding new ways to enjoy your time alone. It's easy to get stuck in a rut after Christmas and New Year's, so it's important to shake things up and try new things.

Try doing something you've never done before, like taking an improv class or traveling somewhere you've always wanted to go! You could also try learning a new skill—maybe even something fun like how to play guitar or dance salsa! Or maybe your idea of fun is staying home with Netflix and chocolate chip cookies, which is totally fine too! If there are things that cost money involved (like travel), but they're not important enough that they'll keep you from enjoying yourself if they don't work out, then go ahead and give them a shot! You might be pleasantly surprised at what happens once everything gets going!

When all else fails, look outside yourself for support: find friends who will do activities with you on their own time; reach out on social media if nothing comes up organically; ask family members if there are any activities they'd like company while doing during the holidays (this may mean visiting relatives).

Conclusion

If you're feeling down, try to remember that everybody goes through times like this. Don't feel bad about yourself just because you're having some tough days! There's no reason to be ashamed or embarrassed if you need some extra time and support during the holidays.

Don't waste precious energy wishing someone would change their behavior or attitude toward you, because it won't happen unless they want it to happen. What happens is often outside of our control, so focusing on what we can do instead is important for happiness and peace of mind during stressful times like these!